TATTOO

AFTERCARE

 

We are proud to carry PurKlenz (Vegan Friendly) and H2Ocean aftercare products for your convenience. H2Ocean does have its own separate aftercare regime, which your artist can go over with you in the studio. We do highly recommend using an aftercare system as it is tried and tested by many professional artists and is made specifically with tattoos in mind. They are free of fragrance, common allergens and parabens.

Please contact us if you have additional questions.

Tattoo Aftercare Instructions

Common Tattoo Misconceptions

TATTOO AFTERCARE INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Leave your bandage on for a minimum of 4 hours. You may wish to sleep with your bandage on if there was excess weeping during your tattoo.

  2. After removing the bandage wash your tattoo thoroughly with warm water and mild soap. 

  3. Gently pat the tattoo and surrounding area dry with a clean towel.

  4. If you purchased one of our Aftercare Ointments, it is safe to use it on your tattoo right away. DO NOT use any ointments that are not meant for tattoos, including Polysporin. (I strongly believe that an ointment will help minimise the amount of scabbing you will have). Make sure to use your ointment VERY SPARINGLY. Ointments need to be applied in thin layers to ensure all of the product absorbs into your skin. DO NOT put moisturiser on your tattoo for the first few days and. You may chose to skip using an ointment all together.

  5. Keep your new tattoo out of the sun and water as much as possible until the scabs have fallen off on their own (yes - you can shower, but do not submerge your tattoo aka- no baths, hot tubs, or swimming!)

  6. On day 3, your tattoo should have a think layer of scabbing. Moisturise your tattoo with a white unscented lotion when it is dry and itchy. Always wash your hands before applying moisturiser to your tattoo. Do not over saturate your tattoo with moisturiser, making sure all of the product absorbs into your skin.

  7. Do not pick or scratch your scabs! Your scabbing will be more like thin layers of skin that will peel just like a sunburn. These flakes will come of on their own and while you are moisturising. It will interrupt the healing process and impact the longevity of your tattoo if you pick at your scabs. On occasion, you may get heavier scabbing. Although these can be uncomfortable and worrisome at times, please leave them be. Picking at these larger scab will be painful, result in bleeding and ultimately lifting colour right out of your tattoo. Avoid moisture on these larger scabs at all costs, this includes lotions. The lotion will get caught up in the scab and just be messy and gross. Applying a small amount of ointment around the edges may help soften the scab and help the new skin around heal.

 

COMMON TATTOO MISCONCEPTIONS

My tattoo is BRIGHT RED, HOT and ALARMINGLY SWOLLEN! It must be infected!

This is highly unlikely. A tattoo is an open wound that you obtained, sometimes over several hours. Especially on tattoos with heavy colour saturation or large fields of solid black, there is a lot of trauma to the skin. It is not uncommon for the tattoo to feel increasingly tight (due to swelling) and uncomfortable, especially in the first 1-3 days after obtaining your tattoo. By simply using an ice pack through a towel or cloth will help relieve pain and swelling. Taking ibuprofen may also help. Treat your tattoo like an injury. If your tattoo is on one of your hanging limbs (arms and legs), elevate them just like you would with a sprained ankle. Feet and ankles are especially susceptible extreme swelling, so if you are on your feet all day following your tattoo, be aware of the consequences. Swelling, redness and some warmth is normal and should subside in a few days.

 

My Dad said they always used Polysporin back in the day!

Ooooh right, back in the 90's when they used deoderant sticks to put stencils on and printer ink to tattoo you with. Do not use Polysporin on your tattoo. It is full of antibiotics and other things that your really don't need to heal. A tattoo is not an infection, it does not need antibiotics.

 

Oh my god, I am stuck to my shirt.

Yup, that's a thing. This is most common with large and heavily saturated tattoos (colour or solid black). Again, a tattoo is an open wound, please be aware of this possibility before leaving the tattoo shop. Your artist may have additional aftercare they would like you to follow. This happens due to your tattoo continuing to weep after you have taken off your bandage and washed your tattoo. Please DO NOT just pull your clothing off your tattoo. That would be incredibly painful and result in injury and loss of ink. Get your clothes wet. Use a cloth or literally hop in the shower with your shirt on. Wetting the clothing will loosen the material gently from your skin without further injury. Please wash your tattoo again at this time. If you continue to notice wetness (plasma) coming from your tattoo, please continue to wash it throughout the day and do not let clothing rest directly on your tattoo.

To prevent your clothes from sticking to your tattoo, there are a couple of things you do. Hopefully, at your appointment, your artist will be aware of the extra plasma already trying to make its way out of your tattoo. If they request for you to leave your bandage on longer please do so. The bigger the "injury" the more care required. Your artist may also have additional steps they ask you to follow at this time. When your bandage does come off, spend some time without clothing on it and see if it is weeping at all. If you notice weeping, please wash it again. Patting excess plasma off with a paper towel and applying a tattoo ointment during this time may help.

Please always make sure to wear soft lint free clothing to bed after getting tattooed. Do not go shirtless after getting a back piece. In the event that your tattoo is weeping while you sleep, at the very least, you will stick to your shirt and not your bedding. It is much more difficult to unglue yourself from the bed sheets rather than your shirt.

 

I thought they weren't supposed to scab much! 

On occasion, you may get heavier scabbing. Although these can be uncomfortable and worrisome at times, please leave them be. Picking at these larger scab will be painful, result in bleeding and ultimately lifting colour right out of your tattoo. Avoid moisture on these larger scabs at all costs, this means lotions and water. The lotion will get caught up in the scab and just be messy and gross. Water will make the scab soggy and soak out the ink. Applying a small amount of tattoo ointment around the edges may help soften the scab and help the new skin around heal.